Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Six Items You Didn’t Think to Recycle

We all know to recycle soda bottles, aluminum cans, paper, cardboard, and milk jugs. But what do you do if you want to go the extra mile to keep your junk out of a landfill? We’ve compiled a list of six common items that aren’t commonly recycled.
  1. Aerosol cans: These can be recycled when empty, but check with your local authority first (DO NOT CRUSH or pierce—they can explode).
  2. Cat Litter: Cat litter can be added to the compost heap—however, it is best to bury or dispose of any cat feces first, to avoid the risk of spreading parasites. You can now buy cat litter made from recycled paper, hemp, and mineral sources—for example.
  3. Motor Oil: You can often take engine oil to a recycling center, service station, or quick-lube shop. See www.recycleoil.org or www.earth911.org for recycling locations throughout the country. Emptying used oil into  drains or into landfills can cause real harm to the environment; just one gallon of used oil can contaminate 740,000 gallons of water.
  4. Soap: You can buy soap presses that make new bars, and even chop them up to make a liquid soap.
  5. Computers: Many recycling projects and commercial companies will take computers, monitors, and associated hardware. They can wipe hard drives with special software and resell equipment to low-income groups, etc. Even broken equipment can be taken apart for components. Many computer components contain dangerous chemicals which can leech into groundwater.
  6. You: Increasingly, more and more people want to leave the world without causing unnecessary pollution. You can now ask for a cardboard coffin, a woolen shroud, or even an ecopod. See www.greenburialcouncil.org


The Limits to Growth and Greece: Systemic or Financial Collapse?

Could it be that the ongoing Greek collapse is a symptom of the more general collapse that the Limits to Growth model generates for the first two decades of the 21st century? Author Ugo Bardi (Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet) examines the correlation between what is unfolding between Greece […] Read More..

Wild Edibles: 5 Tips for Beginner Foragers

Ever spotted a dandelion growing in your backyard and wondered, can I eat that? According to wild plants expert Katrina Blair, the answer is a resounding yes. And there are plenty of other commonly found weeds that fall into this category as well. In her book The Wild Wisdom of Weeds, Blair introduces readers to […] Read More..

10 Books to Celebrate the International Year of Soils

Beneath our feet lies a resource that is critical to our future. It’s the first thing we think about when it comes to farming and gardening – and yet, one of the last things considered when thinking about the long-term preservation of our earth. It’s the basis for healthy food production, is a crucial tool […] Read More..

5 Shareable Strategies for Creating Climate Action

Frustrated about climate change? You’re not alone. Most people in our society find themselves somewhere on the spectrum of depressed about our climate situation to flat-out denying that it exists. In fact, the more information about global warming that piles up, the less we seem to do to combat it. What is the reason for this […] Read More..

A Permaculture Approach to Managing Hedge Bindweed

As Permaculture Month continues, we are making our expert authors available to answer your burning permaculture questions. If you have a question to submit, fill out this form. In the below Q&A, Tao Orion, author of the new book Beyond the War on Invasive Species, discusses how she approaches weed management. Orion believes invasive species are good ecological […] Read More..