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Chelsea Green Blog

On the road with Diane Wilson

Diane Wilson is on the fourth leg of her long (indefinitely?) author tour. After leaving Boston early yesterday she took the train to New York, where she met up with the producers of PBS NOW to film an interview, which will air on December 9. According to Diane, the interview went real well but Penn Station could use some help. Diane missed her train to Bard College, where she was to give a talk to the Human Rights Project last night. She made the event by the skin of her nose. I met up with Diane in Rhinecliff, NY, and brought her to the Bard campus, where we joined Bridget Hanna of the Human Rights Project. Bridget introduced Diane to a crowd of about thirty students, professors, and community members. Evidently Bard is the only school in North America to offer an udergraduate degree in human rights, which accounts for some of the enthusiasm the crowd had for Diane’s activism and her involvement in Bhopal. By the end of her talk Diane had resolved to hunt down Warren Anderson, and students offered to help. One professor in the department claimed that Diane was the best speaker they’d hosted that semester–which says a lot, considering that Dahr Jamail had been to the school the week before. Students were especially interested in Diane’s advice on practicing instant activism. She warned them against sleeping on rash ideas. This theme resurfaced at dinner, where a group of eight Bard community members joined us at Santa Fe Tivolis, a mexican restaurant that Diane called “my kind of place.” This morning we’ll be helping Bridget hang the Bhopal Photo Exhibit, which just arrived on campus.


Economic Development is Broken. Here’s How to Fix It

Economic development today is completely broken. That’s the argument of author Michael Shuman in his new book, The Local Economy Solution. The singular focus on attracting global corporations is not just ineffective but counterproductive, Shuman argues, especially given the huge opportunity costs. Indeed, it’s not far-fetched to suggest that the best way most communities can […] Read More..

5 Shareable Strategies for Creating Climate Action

Frustrated about climate change? You’re not alone. Most people in our society find themselves somewhere on the spectrum of depressed about our climate situation to flat-out denying that it exists. In fact, the more information about global warming that piles up, the less we seem to do to combat it. What is the reason for this […] Read More..

A Mini-Festo for Earth Day – Rebuild the Foodshed

For the past month, author Philip Ackerman-Leist has been on a Twitter MiniFesto campaign – each day sending out a new tweet designed to spark conversation and pass along some lessons he learned whilst working on his last book, Rebuilding the Foodshed. You might also know Philip as the author of his memoir Up Tunket […] Read More..

Books in the News: ‘The Tao of Vegetable Gardening’ & More!

What does Taoism have to do with gardening? That question is being answered in The Washington Post this week with a lengthy profile of Chelsea Green author Carol Deppe—gardener, plant breeder, seed expert, and geneticist based in Oregon—and her new book The Tao of Vegetable Gardening. “Once I read The Tao of Vegetable Gardening, with its […] Read More..

Depressed about Climate Change? Good. Here’s How to Take Action

The facts about climate change are settled. Mostly. In fact, the news seems to get worse, and more urgent, every day. Yet, the more the facts stack up, the less resolve many people seem to have about getting behind solutions that will stem, or turn, the tide. What gives? In What We Think About When […] Read More..