Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Blog

Nine Tips to Save Water this Summer

Global warming is changing the Earth’s weather patterns. The extremes of weather that we’re accustomed to are pulling away from each other. Floods are sweeping through new areas of the country, wildfires are rampaging through neighborhoods, and droughts are drying up once fertile lands. Amidst all this climate turbulence it is important that each of us does all we can to conserve and protect our water sources this summer—whether that’s a well, a spring, or a resovoir. Here are nine ways that you can save water this summer and protect the resource we all need—and need to share. Beginner: 1. Wash your car at home rather than at a car wash. (It takes about 70 gallons of water to produce 1 gallon of gasoline.) 2. “If it’s yellow let it mellow. It it’s brown, flush it down.” 3. Store drinking water in a jug in the refrigerator, rather than waiting for the tap to run cold. (This will also help your refrigerator stay down in temperature! See this video tip.) Enthusiast: 4. If you have an old toilet, you can reduce the amount of water it uses by putting a “displacement device” in the tank. Using small plastic bottles filled with water works well. (Over a quarter of all the clean, drinkable water you use in your home is used to flush the toilets.) 5.  While waiting for your sink water to run hot, collect the cold and use it on your plants and garden. 6. Garbage disposals use a considerable amount of water. Start composting—put the vegetable peelings in your compost bin. Pro: 7. Use a rain barrel to collect the rainwater from your roof, rather than wasting treated drinking water on your garden. Some water companies either provide them free or at a reduced price. You can also build your own. 8.  Build up your garden’s soil by using plenty of manure and compost. This will increase its ability to retain moisture—reducing the need for watering. 9. Hand-wash your laundry. If you have more tips, let us know in the comments! We’d love to hear them.


The Limits to Growth and Greece: Systemic or Financial Collapse?

Could it be that the ongoing Greek collapse is a symptom of the more general collapse that the Limits to Growth model generates for the first two decades of the 21st century? Author Ugo Bardi (Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet) examines the correlation between what is unfolding between Greece […] Read More..

Wild Edibles: 5 Tips for Beginner Foragers

Ever spotted a dandelion growing in your backyard and wondered, can I eat that? According to wild plants expert Katrina Blair, the answer is a resounding yes. And there are plenty of other commonly found weeds that fall into this category as well. In her book The Wild Wisdom of Weeds, Blair introduces readers to […] Read More..

10 Books to Celebrate the International Year of Soils

Beneath our feet lies a resource that is critical to our future. It’s the first thing we think about when it comes to farming and gardening – and yet, one of the last things considered when thinking about the long-term preservation of our earth. It’s the basis for healthy food production, is a crucial tool […] Read More..

5 Shareable Strategies for Creating Climate Action

Frustrated about climate change? You’re not alone. Most people in our society find themselves somewhere on the spectrum of depressed about our climate situation to flat-out denying that it exists. In fact, the more information about global warming that piles up, the less we seem to do to combat it. What is the reason for this […] Read More..

A Permaculture Approach to Managing Hedge Bindweed

As Permaculture Month continues, we are making our expert authors available to answer your burning permaculture questions. If you have a question to submit, fill out this form. In the below Q&A, Tao Orion, author of the new book Beyond the War on Invasive Species, discusses how she approaches weed management. Orion believes invasive species are good ecological […] Read More..