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Joel Salatin on Edible Radio

Kate Manchester of Edible Communities interviews grass farmer Joel Salatin about new enterprises at Polyface Farm, acorn-fed pigs, and the “Sheer Ecstasy of being a Lunatic Farmer” (the title of his next book). Salatin is the loudest and one of the most eccentric voices in sustainable agriculture today. His Polyface Farm was held up as the exemplar for intentional, organic food production by Michael Pollan in The Omnivore’s Dilemma, as well as the producers of Food, Inc., a widely released documentary about our broken food economy. Joel tells Kate about new ventures at Polyface, including finding ways to bring “porcine temporary disturbance and successional freshness” to more of his land. In English, that means he’s letting his pigs feed on acorns in the woods, where they aerate and fertilize the soil, and eat plants that would otherwise compete with trees. In an economic innovation, Salatin has extended an offer to a former apprentice to form an autonomous veggie-growing enterprise distributed by Polyface. This sort of business incubation model is a tremendous opportunity for a young farmer. Hopefully other progressive grass farmers such as Mark Kimball at Essex Farm can provide similar opportunities. Kate and Joel then take a moment to talk about people’s food choices. The two chide those who characterize the organic food movement as elitist, and Joel makes the point that people need to “stop being victims” when it comes to making better food choices. Hailing from a food desert, I disagree somewhat. I recently moved to Vermont (the land of local milk and honey) from Jacksonville, Florida, which up until  three years ago was a city that took 40 minutes to drive across, held a population of close to a million, and had exactly zero local farms. In 2007, things changed when Brian and Kristin Lapinski started Down to Earth Farm. Apart from these brave pioneers, there was nothing a non-gardener could do to get local food of any kind. Not to mention urban residents, who deal with a stereotypical slew of problems from industrial contamination to decaying houses–plus being unable to get decent groceries. While it is always true that people can find new ways to be empowered, we can’t forget all the built-in challenges facing populations for whom choices are limited by factors beyond their control. For the full interview, go to Edible Radio: “broadcasting edible stories from local communities”.


The New Farmers’ Almanac: A Collection of Essays for Beginners

What agrarian future can we realistically build together? This is a question the Greenhorns hope to answer in their latest book, The New Farmers’ Almanac 2015. Greenhorns is an organization for young farmers—a non-traditional grassroots network with the mission to promote, recruit and support the entering generation of new farmers. It exists to celebrate young […] Read More..

How to Achieve Resiliency Through Radical, Self-Reliant Gardening

In today’s world the marketplace distorts our values and our dependence on petroleum keeps us from creating truly sustainable agriculture. So, how can we achieve true wealth and at the same time make society around us more resilient? The answer, Will Bonsall believes, is greater self-reliance in both how we grow our own food, and […] Read More..

Bramble On: The Ins and Outs of Growing Raspberries

Fresh, ripe raspberries picked straight from the garden in the morning. What could be a better start to your day? According to Michael Phillips, author of The Holistic Orchard, growing your own berries is entirely possible for anyone with a bit of space and a passion for the fruit. Brambles grow from the north to […] Read More..

Turning Meat into Money: How to Raise and Sell it Ethically

The consumer demand for grassfed, pasture-raised, and antibiotic-free meats is on the rise, putting farmers and ranchers in a unique position to make a decent living on meat that is produced ethically. But, how exactly do you turn meat into money without resorting to the large-scale industrial techniques of today’s confinement-operations? Look no further than […] Read More..

How to Grow Strawberries Indoors

It’s strawberry shortcake season, which means strawberry harvesting season. But for those of you with no outdoor space for gardens, fear not—you can plant, weed, and harvest all from the comfort of your own home! That’s right: it is possible to grow strawberries indoors, from small spaces. According to R. J. Ruppenthal, author of Fresh […] Read More..