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Watershed Maps Are Community Maps

by Brad Lancaster © 2011 www.HarvestingRainwater.com A watershed is “that area of land, a bounded hydrological system, within which all living things are inextricably linked by their common water course and where, as humans settled, simple logic demanded that they become part of a community.” — John Wesley Powell Political boundaries are arbitrary. Watershed boundaries are real. What watershed, what naturally bounded community, do you live within? Have you walked, run, biked, danced, kayaked it in a big rain? Have you watched the water flow, its volume, its quality, its source, and its destination? I recommend you do. You will better know the Place you live within. You will better know the community to which you are connected, and with which you could connect better still. Below are examples of how some communities are encouraging the strengthening of this connection. Excellent watershed maps are available for Oakland and Berkeley, CA, showing current and historic boundaries and conditions. The even more-elaborate Mannahatta project shows us what Manhattan looked like in its natural state (in 1609) before the city was built. Watershed Management Group, with TerraSystems Southwest, has made a some great Tucson Basin Watershed Maps. You can use these resources to make signs that highlight your neighborhood’s or community’s watershed(s). Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the sign we made for my Dunbar/Spring neighborhood and its watersheds (and click on the link below it to download as a jpeg). Santa Cruz County, in California, is one municipality that places watershed signs where roads cross over watershed boundaries/ridgelines. These efforts help show the flow, instead of obscuring it within drain pipes and other hidden infrastructure, so we can better celebrate the flow, and enhance it and the watershed by turning draining watersheds into harvesting-water catchments. For more on how we can do this on our own sites and within our own neighborhoods, read Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 and Volume 2. For images of examples you can also check out my Water Harvesting Image Galleries. Also check out Brock Dolman’s excellent Basins of Relations booklet, and while you’re at it check out his wonderful Bioneers presentation. It is on YouTube in three parts: Part one, Part two, and Part three.
This 17″ x 16″ all-weather reflective aluminum sign was made for $42 at SignAge in Tucson. We provided the pdf image, they made the sign, and we’ll post it on the Dunbar/Spring community bulletin board on the southeast corner of 9th Ave and University Blvd.
Click to download the JPEG of this Dunbar/Spring Washes and Watersheds sign. For more of Brad’s blog posts, visit his Drops in a Bucket blog.

Brad Lancaster is a dynamic teacher, consultant, and designer of regenerative systems. He is the author of the award-winning, best-selling books Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, the information-packed website www.HarvestingRainwater.com, and the Drops in a Bucket Blog. He lives his talk on an oasis-like eighth of an acre in downtown Tucson, Arizona, by harvesting over 100,000 gallons of rainwater a year where just 12 inches per year falls from the sky.


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Images of Contemporary Water-Harvesting Art

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Images of Ancient Water-Harvesting Art

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